Tag Archives: meat

Southern BBQ Pork Chop Recipe-CrockPot Recipe

Here is a real simple BBQ pork chop recipe that you can either cook up in the crock-pot or in the oven. I included all the prices of the ingredients I used to show how eating organic can be affordable. This recipe is so simple, I put it together with a baby attached to my hip and two fighting preschoolers in the background. Go Go Gadget MOM!

Ingredients:

  • 6-bone in Zweber Farms pork chops (about $7.00)
  • 1 medium onion, thinly sliced (organic $.33)
  • 1/4 vinegar (I used malt vinegar, but you can use any kind of white) ($.66)
  • 3/4 cup water
  • 1 tablespoon honey (organic $.37)
  • 1 tablespoon Worcestershire sauce ($.13)
  • 1/2 cup ketchup (organic $.38)
  • 1 teaspoon pepper (organic $.88)
  • Dash of cayenne pepper (organic $.50)

Mix all ingredients together. To make in the crock pot pour sauce over pork chops and cook on low for 6-8 hours. To make in oven: oven to 350, place pork chops in a 11×15 sheet pan , pour sauce over chops and bake for 30-45 minutes.

I paired this meal with organic long grain white rice ($.50/serving), organic mixed veggies ($1.88/serving) and of course a glass of Organic Valley milk ($.50/serving).  Total cost was: $4.50 per serving.

This meal was super simple, super yummy and super inexpensive. Now that is Affordable organics!

Hunk of Meat Mondays
Enjoy!
Emily
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Filed under 30 Minute Meals, Cooking, Cooking with Pork, Food, Hunk of Meat Monday

Easy Ground Beef Chili-Hunk Of Meat Monday

Disclaimer: I am not a food blogger. Even though I post lots of recipes on this site, Food Blogger is not in my title. I am apologizing in advance for my lack of pictures on this recipe. When I start cooking I often get caught up in what I am doing and forget to take pictures.

I have gotten to the comfort level in my cooking that I no longer “follow” recipes. Sure I still look them up for ideas, but that is usually as far as it goes. This past week I made a super easy ground beef chili. I could have called it Kitchen sink chili, because nearly everything went in it besides the kitchen sink.

East Ground Beef Chili:

  • 2 lbs Zweber Farms ground beef
  • 1 onion diced
  • 2 jalapeno peppers
  • 1 chili pepper
  • 3 cloves garlic minced
  • 10 ripe plum tomatoes sliced
  • 2 cups dry red kidney or black beans soaked
  • 1 tablespoon chili powder
  • 1 tablespoon cumin
  • 1 teaspoon thyme
  • 1 teaspoon marjoram leaves
  • salt and pepper to taste
  1. Brown ground beef and onion together. Drain only if there is a lot of juice.
  2. Add the remaining ingredients. Bring to boil and let simmer for at least an hour. When beans are soft the chili is done.
  3. Taste and add salt and pepper.
  4. Top with Organic Valley sour cream and shredded cheddar cheese.
This easy ground beef chili will serve a crowd. I froze half of it in an ice cream pail for later use.
See what others are posting today for Hunk of Meat Monday
Hunk of Meat Mondays
Emily

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Spaghetti Squash and Pork Sausage Bake-Hunk of Meat Monday

It is squash time! This year both at Zweber Farms and my parents’ farm, we grew several types of  squashes. The most interesting squash to me is the Spaghetti Squash. I love squash of all kinds and thought it intriguing that the flesh when baked looks like noodles. After, doing some quick searches for recipes on the internet, I formed a simple yet tasty recipe using the spaghetti squash and Zweber Farms ground pork.

  • 1- 4lb spaghetti squash
  • 1lb Zweber Farms ground pork (Italian style)
  • 1 small onion chopped
  • 4 tomatoes pureed or 1 jar spaghetti sauce
  • 1/2 cup mushrooms chopped
  • 1 sweet pepper chopped
  • 1 cup shredded Organic Valley cheese

squash1

Preheat oven to 375. Cut squash in half and scoop out seeds and pulp. Bake rind side up for 25-35 minutes.

squash3 pork

While squash is baking, chop onion, pepper and mushrooms. Brown pork sausage in skillet then add onion, pepper, mushrooms and 1/3 cup of tomato puree or spaghetti sauce. Simmer for 5 minutes

squash2

When squash is done, take it out of the oven (leave oven on) and let it cool for 5 minutes. Then scrape out flesh into a large mixing bowl. Add sausage mixture and 1/2 cup cheese.

squash4

Place into baking dish and top with additional cheese. Bake uncovered for 15-20 minutes.

squash5

Take out of oven and let rest for 10 minutes

Serve with crunchy garlic bread topped with Organic Valley butter and a tall glass of Organic Valley milk.

Hunk of Meat Mondays

I hope you enjoy.  Need some pork sausage? Call us today to order a half or quarter of a hog.  Pork will be ready in October and November. We have a few spaces left, but they will not last long. Call: 952-461-3428 or visit the Zweber Farms website for details.

Emily

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Hunk of Meat Monday- New Twist to BLT’s

Tonight, I looked in the freezer to see what there was to make and I saw the package of bacon. I had just picked a whole lot of tomatoes from our garden and the thought of BLT’s came to mind. One problem, I didn’t have any lettuce.

I called Tim to ask him to pick some lettuce from the farm garden, but he gave an even better idea. Why don’t we just use up some of the cucumbers? (They have been in the fridge for a few days and were in jeopardy of going bad) Good idea!! It was super yummy.

bacon, blt Start by frying up some Zweber Farms bacon.  One pound of bacon doesn’t last long at our house. I had to take the picture fast before it was all gone.

Layer Mayo and bacon on toast

Thinly slice up some tomatoes and cucumbers. I set out all the ingredients so we had a “make your own BCT”.

Layer on top of bacon

ENJOY!

This was super good. Thanks to my husband, we had crispy BCT’s and none of the cucumbers went to waste.

Hunk of Meat Mondays

Emily

Zweber Farms is a 4th generation family operated organic dairy.  We are proud Organic Valley farmer members and sell our milk under that label. We also specialize in sustainably raised beef, pork and chicken and sell it directly to customers in Minnesota.Visit our website to learn more, www.zweberfarms.com. Connect with us on FacebookTwitterand YouTube.

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Hunk of Meat Monday-Hamburger and Rice Hotdish

I have to admit: I’m not a hamburger hotdish fan at all. In fact when Tim and I were first dating and he mentioned his two most favorite dishes where tater tot hotdish and his mom’s hamburger and rice hotdish, I almost called it quits. Just kidding (kind of). I’m still not a fan of tater tot hotdish. I guess that is the Italian in me.

The other day I found myself with an empty pantry and no time to run to the store. The two things I did have were hamburger and rice. Ohh misery. I had to break down and make hamburger and rice hotdish. So I searched online until I found a recipe that had ingredients that I actually had in the house. This is what I found on Cooks.com

Hamburger and Rice Hotdish

  • 2 lb. hamburger, browned
  • 1 can mushroom soup
  • 1 can Minute rice
  • 1/2 can 2% milk
  • 1 (12 oz.) pkg. Cheddar or American shredded cheese
Brown your hamburger and drain.
Of course I used Zweber Farms extra lean ground beef.
Top your hamburger with half the cheese.
I used Organic Valley shredded cheddar.
Mix your rice, milk and soup.
I made brown rice and used in place of the Minute.
Spread mixture on top of hamburger and cheese
Top with the remaining cheese.
Bake at 375 degrees for 20-30 minutes
I served the dish with steamed green beans and Organic Valley milk.
Honestly, this was really good and I will probably make it again. Tim of course thought it was excellent. The boys had a mixed verdict. The two year old cleaned his plate and the four year old wouldn’t touch it. Then again, the four year old is going through a “picky” stage.
I am linking up with other Hunk of Meat bloggers at Beyer Beware. Make sure to visit and see what others are making this week.
Hunk of Meat Mondays
Emily
Zweber Farms is a 4th generation family operated organic dairy.  We are proud Organic Valley farmer members and sell our milk under that label. We also specialize in sustainably raised beef, pork and chicken and sell it directly to customers in Minnesota.Visit our website to learn more, www.zweberfarms.com. Connect with us on FacebookTwitterand YouTube.

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Hunk of Meat Monday: Lamb (or Pork) Spareribs with Rosemary, Garlic and Honey

Last few years Samantha has been raising sheep as a 4-H project. This is a small project, but Tim and I have the benefit of being the only ones to like lamb (besides Samantha), so we get first dibs on purchasing a lamb from her each year. I had never cooked with lamb until a few years ago, so it has been a steep learning curve. Lamb has a taste of its own somewhere between pork and beef. Most people think of gyros when they think of lamb, but you really need to venture further than that to get a  real good lamb flavor. So expand you pallet and pick up some lamb today. Here is a simple sparerib recipe from the California Sheep Commission. If you don’t have lamb you can easily substitute pork spareribs, but has luck has it, we still have half of a lamb to sell. If you are interested please contact Lisa at the farm at 952-461-3428 or zweber@integra.net for pricing.

Lamb Ribs with Honey-Balsamic Glaze

Ingredients

3 pounds single racks of  lamb spareribs
Water
2/3 cup balsamic vinegar, divided
6 tablespoons olive oil
Salt, to taste
1 1/2 tablespoons chopped garlic
1 1/2 tablespoons chopped fresh rosemary
2 tablespoons honey

Preparation

Arrange ribs in large pot, and add water to cover. Cover pot and cook over low heat for 1-1/2 hours. Drain; pat dry and set aside. This takes care of extra fat.

In small bowl, whisk together 1/3 cup vinegar and olive oil; brush racks on all sides.

Season racks with salt and rub all over with garlic and rosemary. Cover tightly, and allow to stand in refrigerator at least 6 hours.

To roast, arrange lamb on rack in shallow roasting pan. Cook at 325°F about 1-1/2 hours. Baste all over with honey-vinegar mixture, and continue to cook for 20 minutes longer, basting frequently with honey-vinegar mixture.

The flavors in this recipe are awesome! Unfortunately this is not a quick recipe, but the effort is worth it. We paired this recipe with roasted asparagus, brown rice and glass of Organic Valley milk.

Did you know that lamb is an excellent source of protein, vitamin B12, niacin, zinc, and selenium while being a good source of iron and riboflavin? Also, on average lamb only has 175 calories per 3 ounce serving. To learn more visit the American Lamb website.

View more Hunk of Meat Monday recipes here:

Hunk of Meat Mondays

Enjoy!

Emily

Zweber Farms is a 4th generation family operated organic dairy.  We are proud Organic Valley farmer members and sell our milk under that label. We also specialize in sustainably raised beef, pork and chicken and sell it directly to customers in Minnesota.Visit our website to learn more, www.zweberfarms.com. Connect with us on FacebookTwitterand YouTube.

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Vegetables vs. Meat

I recently read a magazine article that got me a little fired up.

Dear Editor of Body and Soul Magazine,

I wanted to let you know that I love your magazine and read it from front to back as soon as it hits my mailbox.  In the last issue (April 2010), you had an article titled “Healthy Vegetarian.” While most of the article was based on how to get more complete proteins and other nutrients in your diet if you are vegetarian or vegan, there were a few paragraphs that were aimed at trying to convince people to give up meat all together.

Even as an organic dairy, pork, poultry and beef producer, I agree that most American’s eat too much meat. Our lifestyles are too inactive now to allow for large portions of meat at most of our meals. I don’t agree that the elimination of meat (and there for the elimination of animal agriculture) is environmentally friendly. There is low impact meat production as well as high impact vegetable and fruit production.

To have low impact vegetable and fruit production, you need to include animals in a whole systems approach to raising food. Animals provide valuable natural nutrients to soil, can be used as low impact weeders and also pest (insect) controllers. Without animals, vegetable and fruit production can have a high environmental impact by creating a need for petroleum-based fertilizer, favoring mono-cultures and using chemical based pesticides.

In the United States animal agriculture only accounts for 2.7% of green house gases (GHG) according to an EPA study in 2007 (not the 20% stated in the article, based off of a 2006 UN study of the whole world). If there continues to be a strong demand for pasture based raised animals, we may actually see these number decrease because pasture land has shown to store carbon dioxide (CO2).

As consciousness consumers we need look beyond the debate of vegetables versus meat and start looking for whole systems approaches within farms or farming communities.

Thank you for interesting and thought provoking articles. I enjoy reading your magazine each month. As consumers we can have positive influences on the environment just by supporting food production that is in-tune with our values.

Sincerely,

Emily Zweber


Zweber Farms is a 4th generation family operated organic dairy. We also specialize in sustainably raised beef, pork and chicken and sell it directly to customers in Minnesota.Visit our website to learn more, http://www.zweberfarms.com

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More Great Questions from 9th Graders: Eating our Animals

One of the questions that was asked many times in the letters from our ninth grade pen pal class was: Do you eat your animals?

The answer is yes.  We raise our pigs and chickens for the sole purpose of meat production. After our cows have lived long productive lives on our farm they too are harvested for meat. To many this may sound brutal, mean and unpleasant. As farmers we recognize the cycle of life. We provide our animals with a caring and healthy living environments. Daily, we provide them healthy foods, clean water and protective and natural living areas. During their lives, they provide us manure to fertilize our fields with. At the end of their lives, they provide us with healthy and nutritious meat.

I can hear the ninth graders now: ewww, gross, I am not eating meat again, etc. Our culture is so far removed from production agriculture that we no longer want to know about the animal before it became our hamburger. Right now I am reading this incredible book by Ann Vileisis titled Kitchen Literacy. This book takes a historical look at the food culture and norms in the United States starting back in the early 1700’s and ending in the present.

Prior to 1850’s it was very common place for everyone to know exactly where their meat came from. It either came from your own farm, your neighbor’s farm or your town butcher who knew the animal’s life history. It was a source of pride to know exactly what you were serving your family for supper. Home cooks wanted to know an animal’s health history, its living conditions, the type of feed it was fed and how it was slaughtered. All of these factors affect meats nutritional value and taste.

So what changed all this? Around the 1850’s more and more people were living in cities due to massive immigration and the industrial revolution. For the first time, animals had to be sent from the Great Plains to feed the people in the major cities on the East Coast. Since cooks still wanted to know about they animals they were buying meat off of, butchers would buy live animals at auctions. These animals had to endure 2-3 days worth of travel by train in tight compartments without food or water. They usually lost a couple hundred pounds through the trip and ended up with bruises and cracked ribs. Home cooks did not approve of this meat.

In 1857, the first refrigerated freight car was invented. This allowed for meat to be slaughter in the Midwest, then individual meat cuts sold on the East Coast. Even though the meat was higher quality, this method was not adopted by home cooks until the 1880’s. Cooks still wanted to know about the animals and held that information sacred. In the 1880’s Gustavus Swift started marketing his Chicago Dressed Beef and priced his so low that customers started to notice. Even with tough opposition from butchers and others, within a few year even the go-to homemaker magazine Good Housekeeping was recommending Chicago Dressed Beef.

Swift Brothers company prided themselves on producing a product at a low price and in a efficient fashion. This was the first time in food history that consumers were being told to buy for a low price and not worry about quality and only worry about efficiency. No longer did the steak on our plate have a previous life or history. It became a perfect looking prepackaged form that no long had any connection to the animal it once was.

Today in our culture, we are more disconnected than ever from our food source. Many people barely think beyond the grocery store when asked where their food comes from. This is why it isn’t surprising that some people will pay nearly double the price just to know the story of their food. Our family believes it is important to tell the story of our animals. They live honorable lives and are one part of many in the circle of life.

Emily

Zweber Farms is a 4th generation family operated organic dairy. We also specialize in sustainably raised beef, pork and chicken and sell it directly to customers in Minnesota.Visit our website to learn more, http://www.zweberfarms.com

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